How to Make Users Fill Out the Longest 13 Field Form

A compelling form completion

UX Movement

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Many websites attract users to their home page but lose them on the form. Low conversation rates occur when there are too many fields to fill out. Users don’t want to spend that much time and effort without getting an equal exchange in value.

Most companies need to get the necessary information from users, so reducing the number of fields isn’t always an option. What else can you do to make users complete a long, complex form?

Fortunately, there’s a way you can compel users to fill out every field, no matter how long the form is. For example, this 13-field form contains several select menus that look overwhelming and intimidating. Most users would abandon this form and exit out of the website.

However, a research study found that how you frame your form significantly impacts whether users complete it. If you frame your form steps or sections conversationally, users are more likely to fill out every field. (source).

The study reported a 109% lift in conversion rate with this new approach. But the most surprising result was that every user who landed on the form filled out every field, including the six optional fields.

When you divide a long form into steps or sections, don’t use regular headings with a matter-of-fact tone. This approach doesn’t compel users to want to fill out the fields. Instead, it’s better to use headings that have a conversational tone.

Notice how each heading is a question that asks for information like an actual company representative would. It’s more friendly and human than regular headings. You also have the option to add a supplementary subheading below the heading to explain why you’re asking for the information.

Conversational headings aren’t the only way to make your form more human. You can also add a friendly photo of a real or mock representative…

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UX Movement

There’s a good and bad way to design user interfaces. Our publication shows you which way gives the best user experience. https://uxmovement.substack.com