The Aesthetic-Accessibility Paradox

Every interface has a subset of users that make up the majority and minority. The majority of users usually have normal vision, while the minority have some form of visual impairment.

There’s a big difference between what normal-visioned users see versus what color blind and low vision users see. These users tend to experience blurry text and faint elements when text sizes and color contrasts are too low.

The goal of accessibility is to meet the needs of the minority because they’re often forgotten. But what happens when meeting the needs of…

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There’s a good and bad way to design user interfaces. Our publication shows you which way gives the best user experience. https://uxmovement.com

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UX Movement

UX Movement

There’s a good and bad way to design user interfaces. Our publication shows you which way gives the best user experience. https://uxmovement.com

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Accessibility considerations for color